Blog Archive

I’ve been following advertising master, Stan Richards, and The Richards Group for most of my career.

When it came time to create a list of graphic design superstars, Stan was right there at the top. (You can read the interview I did with him here.)

This beautifully crafted :30 second commercial is just another example of the great work done by this blue ribbon agency in Dallas, TX.

Motel 6 and The Richards Group recently joined forces with production company King and Country (K&C) to create a :30 commercial that debuted as the centerpiece of a cross-media campaign celebrating the brand’s 50th anniversary. The spot takes us on a classic family road trip that spans 50 years. Rick Gledhill directed for K&C. This spot was completed start to finish all in house at K&C – production, direction, editorial, animation, and VFX.

If you enjoy this post, you may also enjoy these:

A Showcase of Amazing Graffiti Art
25 Websites with Stunning Big Background Photos
Showcase of Creative Magazine Covers
45 Fun and Creative Examples of Print Advertising
35 Amazing Ads Created in Photoshop
55 Business Card Designs for Your Creative Inspiration (With Tutorials)
40 VERY Cool Examples of Concept Art

Provided here for your education and inspiration by:

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, California, USA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
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Who Is Your Ideal Customer?

There are no tags

Why should you care? Why should you create an Ideal Customer Profile (ICP)?

Because if you don’t, you’ll waste time trying to sell your services to people who:

  • Can’t afford what you’re selling.
  • Don’t want what you’re selling.
  • Can’t understand why they’re hearing from you.

If you deal in the business-to-business realm, as I do, your ICP should include such information as:

  • The industry or industries in which your target company operates.
  • The company’s annual revenues.
  • Whether the company is in startup stage, is growing, or is mature.
  • Whether the company is publicly traded or privately held.
  • The job title(s) of who you’re going to contact in this company.
  • Your contact person’s budgetary authority, e.g., can your prospect spend money on your services without having to ask the boss?
  • Location of the company. (Are you focusing on companies in your hometown? In your state or province? Nationally or internationally?)

Identifying Your Ideal Customer

To begin, take a tip from Ivana Taylor of DIY Marketers, who suggests modeling your ideal customer profile on an actual customer. Consider what makes this client perfect in your mind. When you’re done, your profile may be similar to this example:

My ideal client is in the medical instruments manufacturing industry. The company grosses $10 million or more per year and is in a growing sector of their industry. The company can be either in a private or public company, and I primarily work with professional managers, directors, or vice presidents of marketing who have full budgeting authority, rather than owners. The company is located within my city, or within 45 minutes of my office.

Get Rid of the Rest

The primary purpose of this exercise is to ensure that all your marketing, web copy and messaging targets this specific type of customer. It also makes it much easier to purchase lists of new prospects. Again, if your branding is too generic, and you’re trying to be all things to all people, you’ll fail. Zero in on writing your messaging directly to this ideal customer, and you’ll find that you instantly attract more of them.

The secondary purpose of the exercise is to get rid of the client types you don’t want. You know the ones – you lose money working with them simply because they take up a lot of your time. Or they try to nickel and dime you on projects. These customers aren’t worth your time, and by better targeting your messaging, you’ll send subtle signals that send them the other way.

By properly identifying who your ideal customer is, you set your company on the right track to getting more (and better) business.

(Thanks to Martha Retallick and smallbiztrends.com)

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, California, USA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

I know. I know. You’ve probably seen quite a few Facebook timelines by now, innovative or otherwise, the good, the bad, and the ugly…. But hey, these are celebrity timelines. . . . So, why not take a peek. Either way, it could be a fun break in your busy day, and who knows, you might even be inspired to change your timeline? (Thanks to 2expertsdesign.com for compiling most of this list.)

Enjoy!

1. Tom Cruise

2. Daniel Craig

3. Will Smith

4. Megan Fox

5. Kate Elizabeth Winslet

6. Hugh Jackman

7. Jennifer Aniston

8. Tom Hanks

9. Adam Sandler

10. Dwayne (“The Rock”) Johnson

11. Vin Diesel

12. Selena Gomez

13. Jennifer Lopez

14. Pamela Anderson

15. Nicole Kidman

16. Matthew Perry

17. Robin Williams

18. Jude Law

19. Eddie Murphy

20. Ben Stiller

21. Leonardo DiCaprio

22. Orlando Bloom

23. Katherine Heigl

24. Audrina Patridge

25. Robert DeNiro

26. Jackie Chan

27. Carmen Electra

28. Jim Carrey

29. Reese Witherspoon

30. Justin Timberlake

31. Steve Stifler

32. Wentworth Miller

33. Liv Tyler

34. Mr. Bean

35. Angelina Jolie

36. Christina Aguilara

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, California, USA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

Success Secrets from Clive Piercy:

  • You really need to identify who you want to work with. I don’t think you should start your own business too early.
  • If you do really good work, you get good work coming to you. I believe that’s the best thing you can do.
  • The way to do good work is to attract clients who push you to do what you do best and know the difference between you and somebody else.

About Clive and Air Conditioned:

Air Conditioned is the Santa Monica-based design office of Clive Piercy. For the previous twenty years, Clive was founder, partner and Creative Director of Ph.D, a studio internationally recognized for work characterized by its appropriateness, character, style and wit.

A|C’s mission is to work together with smart, creative clients, on projects large and small, to produce idea-driven solutions that engage, enrich and resonate. Would you like to work with them?

Early beginnings:

I got a job while I was still in college, a great job at BBC Television in London. I got recommended for the job by the only tutor that I got on well with. It was a very glamorous job, but I realized afterwards that they really only hired me because I was a good soccer player, and I could play for their soccer team.

It’s the truth. The guy said to me, “I’m going to hire you. I really like your attitude, but I don’t particularly like your work.” I was very cocky. I thought I was really something. It was a good awakening.

Apprenticing with one of the greats:

I worked as an assistant there for 2 years for the guy who was generally regarded as the resident genius there. His name, Graham McCallum. And he was fantastic, but he was a lazy devil. He’d done it all really. And so he would give me his work to do, and because he was getting all the best work, as an assistant I was getting better work than all the designers there.

They very quickly made me a graphic designer, and I was actually the youngest designer, but when they made me a designer I went to the bottom of the designer rung. So I was getting worse work as a designer than I was as an assistant. (Laughter.)

Since I was kind of hotheaded, I just said, “I’m done with this. I don’t want to do this. I’m better than this,” that kind of thing. I was brash. I just left.

I’d always wanted to work in print. I kind of stumbled into BBC graphics, just because they offered me the work. I didn’t know anything about film or animation or live action or anything, but I survived fine. I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was one of the greatest work experiences I’ve had.

Moving to America:

My wife, Ann Field, and I had previously been to America on a couple of jobs and we thought, “Let’s give America a shot.” You know? We came for six months and we we’ve been here 26 years.

I’d always wanted to come to Los Angeles. I’m a big fan. I tell everyone that I was surprised Los Angeles was in color when I got here. (Chuckling.)

I grew up watching Billy Wilder films and looking at Max Yavno photographs. I liked the notion of Los Angeles in the 40’s. I wanted it to be like James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, Nathaniel West and all that.

It’s a very glamorous place for anybody. If you ask most people, they’d like to come to California.

Starting out in Los Angeles:

When I came here, I went to work for Rod Dyer. I went to him because everybody great has worked for Rod. And so from my reputation, he said, “Oh, I’ll hire you. I’ll give you some work if you come over.” I became the creative director there, and stayed for 5 years.

As you know, Rod does entertainment graphics. Over time I realized I was not cut out for that. And so I decided I was going to start my own company, but I didn’t want to do entertainment graphics which kind of cuts out 90% of the work. But I knew I wasn’t right for it.

Thoughts on the dangers of charging too little:

When I worked for Rod, I had a slew of freelance clients. And because I had a full-time job, I was charging my clients virtually nothing. The minute I started my own company, I started charging properly and they all dumped me. (Laughter.) Right off. They all just dumped me. They were using me primarily because I was cheap, and not because I was good. There was another factor in it. It made me realize that you have to make sure that the financial side is in place before you do any work.

Going into business:

Since entertainment wasn’t my preference, I decided to go into business with my partner Michael Hodgson. We formed the company, Ph.D.. We’d known each other from college in England. But, there was no logic or rationale in it. It was just, “Oh, let’s…”

I found an old studio. But I still wasn’t sure I wanted to make the move. So, I went on holiday and said, “If I come back and this studio is still for lease, I’m gonna’ take it.”

New business acquisition at first:

At first, our business came mostly from word of mouth. I had managed to start getting a good reputation by doing good work, and people just referred clients to us.

We had no business plan or anything. But work started coming very quickly and we realized we needed to get a little bit more serious about it. So we consolidated and turned it into a real business. We worked together successfully for about 20 years.

Starting business as Air Conditioned:

After 20 years, Michael and I split up.

I essentially had a mid-life crisis and just did not want to do what I did anymore. We had a biggish company and I realized I’d been the creative director all the time. I basically had done the vast majority of the work and I found myself giving work to designers that I wasn’t proud enough to do myself, just to keep a big office open.

That’s a very typical dilemma that you run into when you become more established. As we grew, so did our staff. I felt that I had lost the me, if you know what I mean. I just stopped being a designer and I was finding myself doing less and less of what I wanted to do. I came to the realization that I really wanted to do something about the types of clients we were getting. I didn’t really want to do more corporate work.

I’d always enjoyed working with other creative companies. That’s really how I became successful, by working with other creative companies. And we were moving away from that. So after 20 years, we drifted apart. He had a family, and was more involved with other things. Besides, our chemistry had changed, and I wanted to see if I could operate in a more enjoyable way.

Thoughts on choosing projects:

By now, I’d been around a long time and lot of good will was being shown towards me from the community. And I really, really love that. I think I’m a popular guy in the business.

I could do a ton of work, now, but I really just want to take on the jobs I feel I’m appropriate for. And I’m able to see it in a slightly clearer light now.

I’m the creative director of a big clothing company, Roxy. So I have that as a massive monthly commitment. And then I’m able to choose the jobs I want to work on, and I have a small group – 5 people. At the moment that’s all I want. I really feel like this is the way. This is what I should be doing for a while.

New business acquisition today:

The fact I have a new company with a new name and a little bit of a new image helps. I call the company Air Conditioned because I want to have a very kind of light touch on the work. I don’t want to be a show off designer.

I’ve done a new website and that seems to be very popular, but I’m not sending out pieces or doing brochures and all that stuff. I feel that’s kind of old hat.

As the creative director at Ph.D., I was on the front end, so I knew all the clients. And a lot of them just followed me when I moved. Also, I’ve never had a problem with repeat work. We never had much attrition, or falling off rate.

Design influences:

Tibor Kalman, influenced my work, for sure. And, more importantly the people who’ve worked through his offices have too. Steven Doyle, for example, is my favorite designer. And we’re good friends. I think there’s a mutual respect there, but I love his work. He’s the one person who I’m most envious of in this business, talent wise.

Also, I‘ve always had a great love of work of Pentagram. When I started being interested in graphic design, it was in the late 60’s, you know, the Fletcher/Forbes/Gill, Robert Brownjohn and all that great classic 60’s English design.

Classic work. Simple, idea-driven work. I loved all that. And I still really respect the integrity of the majority of Pentagram’s work. Paula (Scher) is the embodiment of a great designer whose work continues to develop and inspire.

Favorite accomplishments:

Teaching is a very big part of what I do. I only do it one day a week, but it’s an integral part of my life, and it has fueled my creative soul in a big way.

It’s allowed me to connect with students. I love doing that and it tests me every week. I’ll tell you another thing, in a selfish way, I get to see good students and sometimes they come and work with me. So that’s been great. And, to balance teaching with my work is the thing that I enjoy the most.

Thoughts on doing things differently:

I went into partnership with a friend who was a fellow designer, and neither of us had much business sense. And because I was the “better” designer, Michael said, “Well, let me try and do the business side.” And that ended up being a frustration all around.

I don’t think he particularly would’ve wanted to do that, but he knew he could be better served in that area than being entirely on the design side. So I guess that was a major error, not having much business sense. In the long run, it didn’t hurt us, but it was frustrating.

Other designers may have done better financially than I have, but I still have a nice little house, a beautiful wife, and I think I get great jobs and all of that.

Clive’s Toughest Challenge:

Well, undoubtedly the toughest thing I’ve had to face in life is the loss of my parents back in England, with me being in California. I’m not sure I’ve been able to translate those experiences into positives that I can bring into my business. I do think that I’ve gained a new perspective on what I consider to be important to me. My beautiful wife, the amazing Ann Field, illustrious illustrator and Chair of Illustration at Art Center College of Design is the reason I’ve made it through.

Tips for people just starting out:

If you do really good work, you get good work coming to you. I believe that’s the best thing you can do.

You shouldn’t be thinking, “We’ll do this. We’ll try our best on the next job.” You’ve really got to be turning out good work in order to get it, in order to attract it. And, by definition, that means then that you’ll get good designers coming in your doors who want to work with you. All those things help.

Thoughts on getting good clients:

I would say the same thing. Just do good work. I do feel that that is the key.

It took me a long time to realize this, because I used to think that the way to do good work was to find a client that you could force into accepting the things you want to do for them.

I used to joke that the client brief should be, “Give me a logo and make it look like I spent a lot of money on it.” That was it. And I realized that there are plenty of people that can do that, but it wasn’t for me.

It took me a long time to realize that the way to do good work is to attract clients that know the difference, who push you to do what you do best and know the difference between you and somebody else. That’s been the most enjoyable thing. It’s the most worrying too, because we all have egos and anxieties and everything. And you just keep wondering, “Can I do it this time around?” But that’s what keeps me going. I love that.

I’m looking for clients that are better than me.

Clive’s thoughts on careers:

You really need to identify who you want to work with. I don’t think you should start your own business too early. There are many pitfalls that you’ll go through. As I said, I teach at Art Center College of Design. I see all the graduating students and they still need a lot of mentoring. They need to go to work for a really good art director for a while and see how it’s done. That’s what I would urge and not to diverge too much from where they think they should be.

First off, they should know who they want to work for, and I find most of them don’t. The majority of them have never heard of the good people. And so you need to identify who you think you’d be right for and they need to bone up on what those people do and then really, really target the kinds of places they want to work. Then, they should gear their portfolio towards that. And I don’t see that. They’re often like lemmings pushed off a cliff most of the time.

Additional Thoughts:

I tell all students that the first day when I’m teaching them, “There are already enough graphic designers in the world. We do not need you.”

“But the difference is there aren’t enough great graphic designers. And that should be your aim.” I like saying that. I feel like that gets them into the spirit. It charges them up a little bit, most of them, if they can be bothered to get out of bed.


Interview by
Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
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Professional links:
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http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://www.WillSherwood.com (Success Secrets of the Graphic Design Superstars blog)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

That’s right. The average recruiter spends only six seconds on your resume.   Here’s how you make those 6 seconds count.

It’s frightening. You’ll spend most of your waking life at a job, yet, according to a new study by TheLadders, the average recruiter spends just six seconds looking at your resume. By the end of that time, they’ll determine whether you’re “a fit” or a “no fit.”

Using eye tracking gear, Evans’ team measured what recruiters really see.

According to Will Evans, Head of User Experience at TheLadders, “The only research that had been done in this domain was self-reporting surveys, which simply was not good enough for us to understand what drives recruiters’ decision-making” So Evans led a study that followed 30 recruiters for 10 weeks. Or, more accurately, it followed just their eyes.

The result is this heat map tracking six seconds of someone’s attention span. (The darker the spot, the longer a recruiter’s eyes sat on that part of the page.) It’s absolutely jarring to see such a clinical view on resume analysis–a clinical view that Evans refers to simply as “a design problem.” Namely, it’s up to job seekers to design a resume that can fit within what are now known restraints.

For more information, visit: http://bit.ly/HZV2am
(Thanks to Mark Wilson, who wrote this article and fastcodesign.com, who publishes the blog)

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
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LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
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http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

Cartoons are a momentous part of everybody’s childhood memories. No matter how old I get, I cannot grow too old for cartoons. Famous animation studios like Walt Disney and Cartoon Network have created some of the most epic and iconic cartoon characters like Mickey Mouse and Cinderella that have etched into our minds for eternity.

Recently, Graphic Design Blog broadcast this interesting post from re:blog that made us jog our memories about famous Disney characters. The team at re:blog has created minimalist posters on Disney’s classic cartoons using the most prominent elements of the cartoon. Some of these were easy to guess without their names, while others required a little bit of recalling.

Here are 20 minimalist posters. Click on the image below and guess which classic Disney cartoons they represent. Don’t forget to mention which ones you guessed correctly in the comment section.

BTW, my son, Brandon, who has Down’s Syndrome got 18 of the 20!

Enjoy!

(Thanks to GraphicDesignBlog.org)

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting?ref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

What?!?

At the Slavery Footprint web site you’ll learn two things.

First is the startling news that there are 27 million slaves in the world (an estimate, obviously), many of whom sustain the supply chains of everyday goods we own and use — the children, for example, who pick the cotton for our clothes and mine the raw materials from which our phones and computers are made.

Second is that the web site, created by MUH-TAY-ZIK | HOF-FER, is brilliantly conceived and designed, which easily explains its powerful reach. Simple icons and childlike colors respond to your touch, moving to and fro, in and out, teaching you about modern slavery and calculating your “footprint.” I especially like it on the iPad, where I first saw it.

It’s a remarkable cause made more remarkable by its design. It’s fresh thinking, not just repurposed print, and a persuasive use of new media. We’ll be seeing more of this.

Enjoy!

Also from MUH-TAY-ZIK | HOF-FER is the similarly impressive Ekso Bionics site, which is another tight marriage of design and story.

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
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Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://www.WillSherwood.com (Success Secrets of the Graphic Design Superstars blog)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

Special Thanks to John McWade who wrote this article:
http://www.mcwade.com/DesignTalk/
www.bamagazine.com/

As you probably already know, money origami is a kind of origami that uses paper money to create artistic objects. It is the art of folding paper money into creative designs. Dollar bill origami uses similar techniques to traditional origami. However, the shape and texture of money sometimes require a different set of steps than creating the same design with origami paper. Won Park is a skilled designer from the US who experiments with money origami a lot. Let’s take a look at what he has created so far and let’s get inspired by his artistic expression and handcraft skills.

(Thanks to Noupe.com and Won Park)

Here are a few of Won Park’s incredible creations. Others may be seen here

Enjoy!

Heart Origami from a $1 bill

Elephant Origami from a $1 bill

Gift Box Origami from a $1 bill

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting?ref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://www.WillSherwood.com (Success Secrets of the Graphic Design Superstars blog)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

Forget that boring nail polish! It’s time to get creative. The link below will take you to 41 examples of insane fingernail art. The wild world of fingernail art is a booming one, and it’s much more intense than one would think.

Breaking out of two dimensional fingernail aesthetics is a master stroke. This may not be the most functional way to adorn one’s fingers, but it will definitely garner attention.

Enjoy!

http://weburbanist.com/2012/04/06/41-examples-of-insane-fingernail-art/ (Thanks to Marc and WebUrbanist.com)

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://www.WillSherwood.com (Success Secrets blog)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)

These days there are so many stock photography websites, that it’s hard to keep up. They used to be extremely cost effective, and compared to commissioning a photographer, they are still quite the bargain. However, over the last year I’ve seen the cost of a medium or large photo (good for a final print reproduction size of 6” x 8”) go from around $8 to $12 to as much as $60 to $150!

It wasn’t that long ago that we could buy a CD with 50 high resolution images for $99. These price increases have us all scurrying to find good stock at a reasonable price, but it doesn’t look like they’ll be going down any time soon. Given these price scenarios, make sure you’re not using clichés.

Seen any of these around?

The stock photos used in the collage above are not the only photos you should avoid using in your designs; of course, you should also avoid using stock photos that are similar to them, in the sense that they also convey a similar, generic feel.

The BEST way to know whether you’re using a cliché photo, check with TinEye to see if they’re already used too often. TinEye is a reverse image search engine that lets you upload your image or enter your image’s URL, and then shows you how many times that image has appeared in other sites. Chances are if you get results as many as – or more than – these:

READ MORE…

(Thanks to YouTheDesigner.com and Cadence Wu)

Will Sherwood
CEO/Chief Creative Officer
The Sherwood Group: Graphic Design & Website Design
Santa Clarita, CA

Social links (Follow us on Facebook and we’ll return the favor):
Facebook Design: http://www.facebook.com/TheSherwoodGroup?ref=ts
Facebook Printing: http://www.facebook.com/SherwoodColorPrinting?ref=ts
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WillSherwood
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/willsherwood

Professional links:
http://www.TheSherwoodGroup.com (Design Site)
http://www.SherwoodColorPrinting.com (Printing Site)
http://www.WillSherwood.com (Success Secrets of the Graphic Design Superstars blog)
http://bit.ly/GYecgn (Google Places)


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